Laury A Egan
                              Photo by Vicki DeVico

Laury A. Egan is the author of the young adult/adult novel, The Outcast Oracle, and the collection, Fog and Other Stories, (Humanist Press, fall 2013). The psychological suspense novel, Jenny Kidd, (Vagabondage Press) was published in 2012. Her stories have appeared in 35 literary journals and have been nominated for awards such as the storySouth Million Writers Award; “The Mime” was a finalist for the Glass Woman Prize. “Split,” “Fergus,” and “Jango Jacks” were honored by Short Story America as “Story-of-the-Week” and read in 56 countries as well as being included in SSA’s Contemporary Library (available for direct download at www.shortstoryamerica.com), and inclusion in Short Story America Anthology Volume 1 and 2. Her two full-length poetry books, Snow, Shadow, a Stranger (2009) and Beneath the Lion’s Paw (2011), were issued by FootHills Publishing, as was a chapbook, The Sea & Beyond (2013).

Related links:

Short stories:

www.sigriddaughter.com
www.thecornerclubpress.com
www.issuu.com
www.qreviewonline.com
www.shortstoryamerica.com
www.lunastationquarterly.com
www.qreviewonline.com
www.bluelakereview.weebly.com
www.roseandthornjournal.com
www.thegsj.com
www.conteonline.net
www.shortstoryamerica.com
www.tryst3.com
www.broomstickbooks1.blogspot.com
www.paradigmjournal.com
www.shortbreadstories.co.uk
www.inthemistmag.com
www.vagabondagepress.com
www.leafgardenpress.blogspot.com
www.thewriteplaceatthewritetime.org
www.themaynard.org

  For and Other Stories  Book Cover   For and Other Stories  Book Cover   The Outcast Oracle  Book Cover
  Paperback and eBook Editions
Humanist Press
Pub Date: September 30, 2013
Revised Edition

The 23 stories in the collection deal with the metaphorical concept of fog as a state produced by grief, mental illness, love, anger, dementia, pain, prejudice, or dreams and how the human being refracts reality through these diffused prisms. Protagonists struggle with psychological and physical distortions that lead them down problematic paths, whether due to jealousy or desire in the case of lovers or hypothermia experienced by a fallen mountain climber. In the story, “Fog,” set in Ireland, the narrator encounters the real thing.

“Laury Egan has the capacity for human understanding which has always defined the top writers of short fiction. In Fog and Other Stories, she has produced a collection of tales which both entertain and matter to the soul of the reader. I am particularly a fan of “Fergus,” “Split,” and “Jango Jacks,” and now the delight of this entire collection is sure to stay with me, as the best short stories do. Brava!”—T.D. Johnston, Short Story America

Fog and Other Stories is a mixed-genre collection of rich, provocative tales. From ruminations on the repercussions of time to mind-bending excursions into the supernatural, examinations of cruelty and kindness to incisive relationship studies, Egan’s stories are a satisfying blend of style, plot, and characterization—and exhibit a deep understanding of human nature.”
—Greg Miller, author of Scaring the Crows and The Uncanny Valley: Tales from a Lost Town

“I found myself stopping after each story and grazing on the beauty of words and the strong characters. Each story kept gathering strength. Egan loves her characters, their humanity shining through, creating each with an honesty and emotion that infuses the plots with a truth held dear.”—R. D. Hartwell

“Egan's book contains some of the finest short stories I've read in years. She has a unique gift for characterization. There are at least a dozen "people" you'll meet whom you won't forget—they'll haunt you for weeks to come, if not longer. Don't pass this one up.”—Karla Linn Merrifield, author of Godwit: Poems of Canada

Read "Fergus" from
Fog and Other Stories

$13.95 Paperback
(5.5 x 8.5 inches, 258 pages)
$7.99 eBook
ISBN: 978-0-931779-43-5 (paper)
ISBN: 978-0-931779-44-2 (eBook)

Available from:
Humanist Press
Amazon Kindle
Amazon.com
Barnes & Noble Nook

Or from your bookstore.

Cover design and photograph
by Laury A. Egan.

  Paperback and eBook editions
Vagabondage Press
Pub date: November, 2012

While spending autumn in Venice, a young American artist, Jenny Kidd, hopes to create a portfolio of paintings to launch her career and establish her independence from her tyrannical father. At the Guggenheim Collection, she encounters a colorful British woman, Randi, who impetuously invites her to a masked ball at the Palazzo Barbon. There, she meets the seductive Caterina Barbon and her brother, Sebastiano, who entice Jenny into a world of glittering façades that cloak sexual perversion, art forgery, and murder. As Jenny struggles between her attraction to Caterina and her growing awareness that she is trapped within the beautiful walls of the palazzo, she discovers an inner strength and spirit worthy of her infamous pirate ancestor.

Review by Jerry Wheeler, © 2012 “Some [books] are little gems, like Laury A. Egan’s atmospheric Jenny Kidd. A top-notch thriller that takes on art forgery, murder and incest, Jenny Kidd spins its web as languidly as an afternoon by the canals. Egan’s descriptions of the food, the art, and the general atmosphere are as purposeful as they are evocative. Her prose is full-bodied and elegant, and she makes prosecco and prosciutto as sumptuous as the work of Titian and Tintoretto. Jenny herself is also well-rounded—a woman seeking independence, anxious to make her own way in the world yet still dependent on her parents for the funds to do so. Venice represents freedom for her, which is why the robbery, the kidnapping and her eventual imprisonment within the walls of the palazzo seem so brutally unjust in those surroundings. And you couldn’t ask for more worldly, dangerous, perverse, and utterly charming villains than Caterina and Sebastiano. As delicious as Egan’s writing is when it comes to describing masked balls, four-course lunches, and miniatures painted in pastels, she also knows how to propel a mean action scene. The last twenty pages or so are a breathless rush of dark passageways, tense interrogations, and perfectly executed gore that leave you gasping and satisfied. And that’s how I felt when I finished the book—satisfied. Just as you would be after a fine meal or an afternoon excursion with good friends. All the ends were tied up with stylish bows, and I really regretted leaving Venice and Jenny Kidd behind.”

G & L Review by Martha Miller
“The beginning chapters of the book are filled with desire, seduction, and sexual obsession. While the story starts slowly due to the author’s careful and intricate construction of the plot elements, eventually the pace picks up. The plot becomes precise and at times dizzying in its twists and turns. Speaking for myself, once I had reached the half-way point in the book, I found it impossible to put it down. This is Laury Egan’s first novel, though she’s published two books of poetry and a short story collection. She does not abandon the rich language displayed in her shorter works, including her vivid descriptions of the canals, bridges, cafes, and cuisine of Venice. Not only does her book offer a riveting story, but her sentences have a cadence that will carry you along.”

Read Chapter One from
Jenny Kidd

$14.95 Trade Paperback
5.25 x 8 inches, 214 pages
ISBN: 9780615687612
$4.99 ePub, Mobi, and PDF formats

Available from:
Vagabondage Press
Amazon.com
Barnes & Noble
Powell's Books

Or from your bookstore.

Publisher’s Link:
www.vagabondagepress.com

  Paperback and eBook editions
Humanist Press
Pub Date: September 30, 2013

© Kirkus Reviews, Vicky Smith
(Starred Review)
“In this brilliantly written novel, a girl who lives with her con-artist grandfather after her parents have gone wandering hopes to lead a more honest life but must scheme to get by when he dies suddenly. Charlie looks much older than her 14 years when she dresses up and puts on makeup, enough to fool a social worker who comes to call. Charlie and Grandpa run a moonshine business and the Glory Alleluia Chapel to make ends meet, and Grandpa has started a small pyramid scheme that helps Charlie stay afloat after he dies. Between that and insurance fraud, he’s buried money all over his large wooded property. Hoping to avoid an orphanage, Charlie hides Grandpa’s body and stashes the cash. A 30-ish cowboy type, Blake, turns up after an affair with Charlie’s absent mother; he clearly knows about the buried money and uses that knowledge as leverage. As much a grifter as Grandpa ever was, he builds up the family religion business by passing off Charlie as a miracle worker. Can Charlie escape him too and pursue her own dreams of becoming a writer? Egan tells the story in Charlie’s first-person countrified style, but with True Grit–style lofty grammar and sentence structure, in keeping with Charlie’s abundant talent. It’s this highly literary, easily accessible writing that lifts this story to the very top of the heap. Simply delicious fun from start to finish.” 

© LibraryThing
“I found Egan's writing to be wonderfully evocative. Charlie really came alive to me in her first-person narrative, and so did her community and family. It's just a little thing, and maybe not so lovely out of context, but when describing the moonshine business early in the first chapter, she explains why the ledger sometimes takes until the first of the month to tally properly: ‘Some of his customers run short of cash when they forget to earn a living because they enjoy the moonshine too much.’ I love how much she says there, about the business, about the customers, about the community. I loved reading The Outcast Oracle and am very grateful that I was selected to receive it as part of the Early Reviewers program. If this is the quality of fiction that the Humanist Press is putting out, I am definitely going to be seeking more of it. And more of Egan's works, too, for that matter. This book was listed as YA at some point, but I'm not sure it really is. The protagonist is a teenager, but it seems that the content of the book is more suited for older teens or adults. At least, I don't think labeling it as YA is the best idea, since that often limits the audience.”

Goodreads, Review by Dave Schey (****)
“The main character in The Outcast Oracle has a background with which most readers will not easily or quickly identify. Charlie is a 14-year old girl living alone with her grandfather, who is a self-made, non-seminary-educated, preacher. He also sells moonshine on the side and is involved in other rather shady scams. Charlie has been deserted by her parents, who have problems of their own, and she does everything she can to stay out of being placed in an orphanage. Charlie is a gifted writer and occasionally substitutes for her grandfather by delivering the Sunday message at his church. After her grandfather dies and with the help of a 'cousin' who suddenly drops into her life, she learns to perform 'miracles.' Charlie is a non-believer and desperately wants out of this life into which she was pushed. However, the preaching and miracles help her make enough money so that in the end she is able to escape her rural home town in upstate New York to attend a distant college. The author, Laury A. Egan, does a great job in telling the story in a way that makes the reader understand why Charlie reacts and does the things she does, in spite of the fact it is probably different from the way they would respond. However, once the reader sees her responses, they understand; of course, that's the way Charlie would act, and you admire her courage. I enjoyed the book because I was never sure what would happen next or how the story would end. The author does well in holding the readers interest, and it's hard to put the book down. I look forward to Laury's next story.”

Read Chapter One from
The Outcast Oracle

$13.95 Trade paperback
(5.5 x 8.5 inches, 214 pages)
$7.99 eBook
ISBN: 978-0-931779-36-7 (paper)
ISBN: 978-0-931779-37-4 (eBook)

Available from:
Humanist Press
Amazon Kindle
Barnes & Noble Nook
Google Play

Or from your bookstore

Cover design and photograph
by Laury A. Egan.

Home    Fiction   Poetry   Photography

Copyright © 2008-2016 Laury A. Egan